wagyu beef strip steak

Easy Wagyu Beef Strips Steak Recipe! (Under 5 minutes)

Welcome to ourfoodrecipe guys and today we’ll be cooking a very delicious wagyu beef steak recipe.

Wagyu beef is a very rare yet amazingly mouth-watering dish.

So without further ado, let’s dive straight into the recipe instructions.

Ingredients for Wagyu Beef Steak Recipe:

  1. 16 oz Wagyu Beef Steak
  2. Sea Salt (sel gris)

How do you cook the Best Wagyu Beef Strip Steak?

wagyu beef strip steak

Slice a 1 inch by 1 inch strip about 3 to 4 inches long

Sprinkle judiciously with a little sea salt (sel gris)

Next heat a clean stainless steel pan to medium high

Warning: do not cook over an open flame, the high fat content and low melting point means possible flare-ups

Gently set your Wagyu beef strip in the pan and let it sizzle for 1 minute or so.

You don’t need any oil, the fat from the Wagyu will melt into the pan allowing you to cook your steak with its own juices.

wagyu beef strip steak

Gently turn your strip over to cook on the other side for approximately 30 seconds and quickly sear the edges.

Remove the steak and let it rest on a plate for 3 to 4 minutes.

It’s important to let your beef rest before eating.

Serve and savor this legendary Wagyu beef strip steak recipe!

How do you marinate a Wagyu Steak?

The marinade I’m going to tell you about is really amazing, the steaks will be so tender and will taste fabulous.

This marinade is very subtle and it really enhances the meat well.

For this recipe, you’ll need to take out your blender.

If you don’t have a blender in the house, no problem.

Just use a large bowl and a whisk instead.

Start by pouring 1/3 of a cup of soy sauce into the blender or bowl.

Then add half a cup of olive oil.

Squeeze the juice from a fresh lemon to make 1/3 of a cup.

Follow that with a quarter cup of Worcestershire sauce.

A teaspoon of dried minced garlic and one and a half tablespoons of garlic powder.

3 tablespoons of dried basil.

One and a half tablespoons of dried parsley flakes.

And 1 teaspoon of brown white pepper.

For an extra kick, add a quarter teaspoon of hot pepper sauce.

Almost done now.

Cover the blender and blend on high speed for about 30 seconds or until the marinade is thoroughly mixed.

And that’s it, pour the marinade over your steak, turning it several times to coat meat well.

Cover your steak and refrigerate for up to 8 hours.

Then cook the steak however you like.

Make sure you discard any leftover marinade.

What is Wagyu beef?

Wagyu means “Japanese cattle.”

The reason why this is so special is primarily just genetics.

Japanese cattle, probably due to their long-time geographic isolation, have a few pretty unusual traits, the most remarkable being their potential to grow a huge quantity of intramuscular fat AKA marbling.

This chunk of Wagyu rib section is graded A5, which is as good as it gets.

“A” means the animal yielded more meat than a B or C carcass, and “5” means it has the most marbling on a one-to-five scale.

It is literally about half fat, half meat.

I’ve eaten real Wagyu once or twice in restaurants, in very small amounts.

The term Wagyu refers to four big Japanese cattle breeds, but these days most of it is one breed: Japanese Black cattle, which are exactly what they sound like.

And while the breed’s roots are ancient, its meat was not always so shot through with fatty snowflakes.

That is the result of a change in trade policy that occurred in 1991, the so-called Uruguay Round of World Trade Organization negotiations.

Japan finally agreed to allow imports of foreign beef.

Japanese beef producers were rightly terrified that they were about to get muscled out of their own market.

Japan is not naturally suited to inexpensive beef production.

The United States is, and huge swaths of it remain, to this day, very sparsely populated grasslands, where legions of cattle can graze on endless free food.

Japan doesn’t have much land at all, and a lot of what they do have is rocks.

The rest is rice and cities.

So if Japanese farmers figured they couldn’t compete with imports on price, they could compete on quality — turn domestically grown Japanese beef into a luxury good.

Instead of bulls and cows, they started producing more steers and heifers — that is, castrated males and celibate females.

You can’t get new calves out of them, but you can get fattier meat.

The farmers also started feeding the animals way more concentrated feed — that is grains, like corn, as opposed to roughage, stuff like rice straw, which is not as energy dense, but it’s very available in Japan.

Because Japan is mostly rocks, rice and cities, most of that grain has to be imported from overseas, which really drives up the cost of the beef.

Another thing that makes it more expensive is the Wagyu animals are slaughtered when they’re a little bit older.

They get fattier meat that way — generally slaughtered around 30 months.

These and other techniques were combined with Wagyu’s peculiar genetics, and the result is this preposterous beef butter that really could only have worked in a consumer market like Japan.

The traditional Japanese way of eating is big bowl of rice — that’s the main event — and then you have some other stuff with it.

Beef, that is literally half fat, works when you’re only planning to have a few little bites of it with your rice.

In America or Argentina or Australia, where pastures are wide and beef is cheap, the traditional beef dinner is a big honkin’s steak.

The meat is the main event and that works with relatively lean beef.

Trust me, you would not want to belly up to a big 12-ounce Wagyu steak, the way you would with a traditional American steak.

You’re not going to feel good.

Cautionary tale coming.

The first Wagyu beef in the States was Kobe.

Kobe is Wagyu from a particular Black cattle strain produced in the area around Kobe, or at least that’s what it’s supposed to be.

Japan did not export any beef until 2012.

So if you ordered Kobe off a menu in New York before then, you were either getting hot products that somebody had smuggled in, or more likely you were eating a cow that had been raised here in the States that had some Wagyu variety as part of its gene pool.

There are now producers all over the world raising great Wagyu beef, either pure-bred or more likely a cross.

Wagyu calves are in short supply, and so they literally cost more.

And as a result, purebred Wagyu is in short supply outside of Japan — most Wagyu produced outside of Japan ain’t the real deal.

You might also like: Blackened Salmon With Shrimp & Grits Recipe (Cook Under 60 Minutes)

 

wagyu beef strip steak

Easy Wagyu Beef Strips Steak Recipe

Prep Time 8 hrs
Cook Time 5 mins
Course Dinner, Main Course
Cuisine Japanese
Servings 2 people
Calories 0.472 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 16 oz Wagyu Beef Steak
  • 2 tbsp Sea Salt (sel gris)

Instructions
 

  • Slice a 1 inch by 1 inch strip about 3 to 4 inches long
    16 oz Wagyu Beef Steak
  • Sprinkle judiciously with a little sea salt (sel gris)
    2 tbsp Sea Salt (sel gris)
  • Heat a clean stainless steel pan to medium high
  • Gently set your Wagyu beef strip in the pan and let it sizzle for 1 minute or so.
  • You don't need any oil, the fat from the Wagyu will melt into the pan allowing you to cook your steak with its own juices.
  • Gently turn your strip over to cook on the other side for approximately 30 seconds and quickly sear the edges.
    16 oz Wagyu Beef Steak
  • Remove the steak and let it rest on a plate for 3 to 4 minutes.
    16 oz Wagyu Beef Steak
  • It's important to let your beef rest before eating.
  • Serve and savor this legendary Wagyu beef strip steak recipe!
    16 oz Wagyu Beef Steak

Notes

  1. Warning: do not cook over an open flame, the high fat content and low melting point means possible flare-ups.
  2. You don't need any oil, the fat from the Wagyu will melt into the pan allowing you to cook your steak with its own juices.

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